Category Archives: Property Development

Home extension plans Derby

The first stage of planning a home extension is to get your home extension designed so you will need to get your ideas or sketches draw up by an architect. These will either form the basic design for your planning application drawings or for your building regulations drawings. The first stage is that your architect will meet you at your property and carry out a survey of the property, to create drawings of your property, it is these drawings that are called the existing drawings. From these drawings the architect will be able to take measurements and work out how best to get your ideas into a fixed design and in the form of a drawing. Then you can check these drawings and make sure you are happy with the proposed design for your new home extension. Then these drawings can be submitted for either a planning application or a full submission building regulations application. Many home extensions can be built without the need for planning applications but it is important that you or your architect check to make sure and either get it in writing or apply for a lawfulness certificate. This will be important if you come to sell or remortgage your home as any conveyancing solicitor will check this is in place before they complete any sale or remortgaging transaction. If you do need to obtain planning permission to build your home extension you can either go through the planning process which take a couple of months and then apply for building regulation approval or carry out the two applications concurrently. The planning process is to determine that your home extension project is in line and in keeping with the current development of your local area. The building regulations process is to check that what you are proposing to build will meet the current building regulations. These are split into various sections titled with a letter for instance part “A” covers the structural integrity, part “P” covers the electrical installation and part “L” the thermal efficiency of the property.

Roof structures

There are various types of roof structures and they are repaired or designed with a combination of timber and steel trusses or roof members. The two main types of roof structures are trussed roofs which are usual on more modern properties usually properties constructed from the late 1970’s to modern day. The second type is often referred to as being stick built, this is when individual timbers or steels are used to form the roof structure. Roof trusses are usually designed and constructed off site and then delivered as readymade trusses and placed on the wall plate and lined up and braced together on site to form the roof structure. With trussed roofs the skill and experience required to fit these correctly is at a lower level than that required for stick built roof structures. Often when more complex roofs are designed and constructed on sites they usually combine individual or linked steel beams as well as individual timbers usually in the form of rafters. The two main timbers used when constructing stick built roofs are the purlins and rafters. Purlins are normally large timbers or steel beams used to reduce the span that the rafters cover by supporting them at the half way point or breaking the span into even thirds. Many home extension roofs use ridge beams this allows for warm or open roof design and is used to eliminate the potential for roof spread. Roof spread is when the loads from the weight of the roof puts too much pressure on the wall plates and can cause the walls to be pushed out. This is a very serious structural problem and can be both challenging and expensive to remedy. One of the more unusual and difficult structural roof steels is a cranked beam. These are some time used to transfer roof loads down from the roof and still allow for a vaulted ceiling or one with sarking detail, or partially sloped ceilings. Cranked steel beams need to be both perfect in length in both directions from the crank angle and the angle must be degree perfect to allow the roof loads and the roof plan to be constructed with the structural integrity as designed. So you will require a competent and experienced roofing and building contractor to make sure these are installed correctly.

How much will my home extension cost?

Many home owners long for extra space and a modern and contemporary home extension but are unsure how to get their home extension projects underway as they fear the costs of such a project. So how do you know that your home extension is going to be in your budget? The obvious answer is to get quotations from local building contractors which is simple on smaller projects. If you have a grander or more unusually building project it is a good idea to employ a quantity or building surveyor. There is a cost involved in this but it can save you huge amounts of money in the long run. These professionals will look at the project and check the costs are below or in line with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors standard schedule of rates. They will help you put a building tender together to make sure that the prices that you get back from building contractors are like for like and that no items and costs have been omitted. This helps reduce the chances of extra and additional costs they will also control costs on site so that extra work and extra costs are all agreed on site prior to you suddenly receiving an unexpected bill. They will help you get a contract in place that both protects you and your building contractor and their role in the project is to act as contracts administrator. They will also be able to recommend building contractors who they have worked with previously and know the quality of their work. Although many home owners are concerned about the costs involved in employing a professional to oversee their building project it does add a level of protection. Many people have stories to tell about less competent and unscrupulous builders and these will be frightened off by the involvement of a contract and a professional to oversee the building project.

Property conversion projects

When converting an existing property to a new use it can prove both an exciting and rewarding experience both financially and personally. This will require planning permission and building regulation approval. The planning can add value to your building as soon as it is granted this is called the planning gain and some property speculators and property developers simply focus on adding value to their property and projects and then selling a property ready to develop. The next consideration is the building regulations approval these can be both onerous and expensive depending on the type of property and the end use. If you are converting older properties or carrying out a mixed use property development the building regulations and other statutory requirements need to be carefully planned and budgeted. With sub division of properties there is an issue called compartmentalisation this is where individual residences flats or muse dwellings or separate commercial units need to be separated from each other. This is when the individual units are separated or compartmented from acoustic and fire spread from the neighbouring units. When carrying out conversions over many floors or in period building this can require careful planning as some services like drainage will need to pass through or from one unit to another. Sound or acoustics requires a carefully specified design and good onsite installation as the units will have to be sound tested upon completion. The integrity of the buildings fire separation between units will be inspected at the site visits by the building control officer. It is important to get a good building contractor on board who has experience on this type of work and can check the design options and advise on cost savings and value engineering. This could save you thousands of pounds and their experience can prove very valuable when any issues that have not been seen or discovered becomes an issue on site.

Buying a new house in 2013?

The property market may have been in the doldrums for the last couple of years with the number of new build properties and transaction volumes languishing at historic lows but many potential buyers are still out there. Many have become feed up of waiting for signs of a housing market recovery and with no signs of prices falling are choosing 2013 as the year they step on the property ladder. So are there still bargain properties to be had? Well the answer is yes but as with most bargains there is usually a catch, and in the case of cheap properties it is usually either the area is less desirable not much can be done about this. Or the property requires some form of a renovation, repair or improvement project it is important that you get an idea of what sort of costs are involved in these works prior to you buying the property. The other issue is that especially in the current climate mortgage companies are becoming far pickier about the type of remedial repairs that will affect a property’s mortgagibility. So ideally get a good local building contractor around before you buy to give you some indication of the costs that will be incurred in bringing the property back up to standard. They also have the experience to know where to look and what problems are associated with that type of property. For instance a good local builder will know that certain streets suffer from poor foundations or issues with the concrete floor slabs. This costs nothing and could save you thousands of pounds so take the time to check your bargain property has not got expensive building works that you may have missed.

Ready to get building in spring?

Many property developers and home owners like to get their projects set up ready to start the building or construction phase early in the New Year. So this time of year is a good time to make sure that you have all the necessary documentation and your building contractors in place. Good building contractors get booked up so it’s a good idea to get the build costs agreed and a start date confirmed. You will also need to make sure you have ironed out all the planning conditions any issues with building control as well as other items that need to be ready before you start your building project. If the building project is a new build or a commercial property you will need to make sure that you put in an F10 form and appoint a competent person to look after your heath and safety responsibilities. You will also need to make sure you have an asbestos report from a suitable asbestos surveyor. There are other items that need to be organised prior to you starting the building works these range from ordering items with long lead times like bespoke stonework of specialist lintels and bespoke windows. Through to organising statutory supplies like gas and electric and checking any requirements under the UK building regulations and if your project will fall under certain statutory requirements like disabled access and fire regulations. The key to a successful and stress free project is to employ good competent professionals like architects surveyors and an experienced and competent building main contractor. As with most things in life cheap is not always the best, good professionals and building contractors can save you thousands of pounds by finding the most cost effective solutions for items like drainage, fire safety and specialist acoustics and other mechanical and electrical solutions. They can also find the best solutions to structural issues saving money on unnecessary steel works. This skill only comes from their experience on other building and construction projects. Good construction professionals will also have a lot of contacts within the industry and may be able to reduce your finance costs and other costs by recommending other industry experts and professionals. They may be able to put you in contact with a good planning consultant or a general practice surveyor these could save you thousands of pounds on issues like party walls and planning conditions. They can often spot issues that you may have missed that may only become issues once your property development is complete and at this stage it could cost you a lot more to overcome.

Matching stone lintels, and period details

Many home and building owners want to make sure they project their investment by matching the existing period details if they are carrying out repairs, extensions or alterations. Many do not know where best to start when matching bespoke period details like stone lintels and corbel or special brick details. There are always options but matching original details can be expensive and it is important to consider the lead time of these items particularly if they form part of the structural element. If you are having stone detailing matched stone masons are usually booked up and cannot run up a couple of hand carved lintels in a few days. So make sure you start to look into suppliers before you start your building project. Again with items like bespoke bricks known as specials in the construction industry these take time to have made and are often tinted which adds more lead time. You do not want your brick layers leaving site to start another job because they have no bricks to lay. These bricks are often set as what is known as string courses often at first floor level so if they are not organised to site quickly you can end up with the build on hold just as it is starting to take shape. With stone work you can either go for natural stone or a reconstituted stone that is formed in a mould. These are considerably cheaper than the original stone work however this does have a few disadvantages. The first is that a purest will spot the reconstituted stone and this could potentially devalue your project and property. The other issue is that reconstituted stone requires a certain curing time for it to harden so again it can slow your building project down. Finally be careful if you have large openings to support because reconstituted stone lintels are not as strong as their natural stone counterparts. This means that on larger openings you will require specialist lintels to be added to the reconstituted stone lintels. This again can cause delays and reduces the savings made as well as this you can often see small sections of the steel lintels. This again detracts from the overall look, feel and success of your finished period renovation or home extension.

Ridge beams and structural steel RSJs

Many home extensions are now built using steel beams to allow for larger rooms and open ceilings and this allows home owners and architects to create larger open plan living spaces. Modern living for families or entertaining often demands that extra open plan living space and at Christmas time when families get together it proves very useful. There are different types, sizes and combinations of steel beams or RSJ’s used dependant on the size and loadings that are required to create large rooms upstairs and downstairs. It is sometimes the case on grander home extensions that gable ends are constructed mainly out of steel and glass to give large door openings and let in large amounts of natural light. This type of design was once contained to barn conversions or very high end house design but is becoming more popular on even simple single story home extensions. Ridge beams allow you to circumvent the need for roof trusses and allow you to have full height or warm roof construction. This gives a great feeling of space and with the addition of roof windows allows for even greater levels of natural light. These more complex designs and steel works do require a greater level of skill and experience from your building contractor so make sure you can see examples of previous similar projects they have carried out. With steel frames and cranked steel beams the fitting and measurements need to be carefully worked out and fitted but a competent builder who has experience in carrying out this type of work will be able to deliver some beautiful finishes and designs. Steel beam and RSJ sizes vary dependant on the loads and spans that are required. They are usually specified by their depth this is the upright section called the web and the horizontal sections called the flanges. The sizes of the beams need to be specified by a structural engineer and their calculations will need to be checked by the building inspector. The steels are also specified by their thickness usually classed in the weight per metre. So for instance you would get a steel beam or RSJ specified as being a 178mm (the depth) by 102mm (the width) by 19UB this is the equivalent to the weight per meter.

Dilapidation reports and repairs

Dilapidations is a phrase well know in the world of commercial property but is something that can catch out and be an expensive lesson for commercial tenants. Depending on the wording and conditions of commercial property lease agreements will depend on who is responsible for which and to what degree of property repairs and other associated costs. For instance if you are a commercial tenant and you have occupied a property for many years you may be responsible to return the property to the landlord with the appropriate statutory requirements in place. This does not sound to onerous but if could mean the introduction of various fire safety and other stator requirements. This could mean a new electrical fire detection system, fire doors and frames and some additional fire separation between fire exists. Dependant on the size and condition of the property this could leave the tenant with a bill for tens of thousands of pounds of refurbishment works. It is important to get a contractor on board who understands not only what needs to be done but also who needs to be informed and how to manage your dilapidation and repair budget. Even if the work is carried out by the correct competent person to the correct standard using the right materials you could still fall foul of the regulations and approval of building control. This could then create further issues and costs associated to getting in or out of the lease. There are different types of commercial property leases but retailers are very often only prepared to sign what are called weather leases. This term is used to describe a lease agreement where the landlord remains responsible for keeping the building weather tight and the tenant for the internal elements. So essentially the landlords keeps the roof, walls and external windows and doors in safe and serviceable condition while the commercial tenant looks after the rest.

Commercial refurbishment projects

Commercial properties are exposed to a lot more wear and tear than private houses and for that reason and other commercial requirements usually undergo a programme of refurbishment more regularly than houses. Retail, offices and other commercial facilities not only tend to have more foot traffic but they also fall under stricter and more onerous statuary requirements and regulation. This is why it is important to employ competent refurbishment contractors who understand and can advise not only on your businesses requirements but also on statuary requirements. There are several issues to be aware of when carrying out a commercial property refurbishments. They range from asbestos management and refurbishment surveys though to disabled access assessments. It is also important to involve a fire safety consultant as well as informing the local authority building control department or a private building inspector. With a competent building contractor they will have a good outline understanding of the various regulations but will require input from the various professionals to make sure they have covered all the site specific issues like interpretation of the various regulations. The regulations can be effected and budgets affected by a variety of other aspects. The end use of the property, if it is listed or in a conservation area even down to the use class orders or if it is zoned as a town centre property. It is also important to make sure that there are no under lying issues with the property that could affect the works once the refurbishments has been completed. It is important to get exposed areas checked for issues like damp or structural defects that will be covered up and could come back to cause problems in the future.